Upcoming events

    • April 22, 2020
    • The InterContinental San Francisco (room TBD)
    • 16
    Register

    Protocols 101: A Case-study Intensive on How to Start the Conversation at Your Institution

    Wednesday, April 22, (time TBD)

    The InterContinental San Francisco (room TBD)

    Workshop description:

    This workshop is designed to be an interactive “clinic” that compliments the Protocols 101: How to Start the Conversation at Your Institution course originally presented by Nicholas Wojcik with guest speaker Veronica Reyes-Escudero on May 15, 2019 in Tucson, Arizona.

    Through small break out group exercises and guided discussions, Protocols 101: A Case-study Intensive will continue to explore the tenets of the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials (PNAAM), a recently endorsed Society of American Archivists (SAA) standard. Participants will be prompted to analyze real world scenarios and case studies that highlight best practices for successful outreach and collaboration as well as explore possible action items that address the question: “How can your institution prepare for proactive communications with tribal communities?" Attendees are highly encouraged to view beforehand the video recording and lesson plan for Protocols 101: How to Start the Conversation at Your Institution course posted here on the Sustainable Heritage Network.

    Presented in collaboration with the Society of American Archivists’ Native American Archives Section

    Instructors:

    Liza Posas joined the Autry Museum of the American West in 2005 where she currently serves as the Head of Research Services and Archives. In this capacity, she oversees the long-range planning and implementation of the Autry’s archival program that includes the acquisition, processing, collection management, and curatorial activities of the Autry’s institutional archive and manuscript collections as well as supervise archive and reference staff. Her recents projects at the Autry, include the development of interdepartmental procedures and practices related to proper and ethical stewardship for collections that contain culturally sensitive information or restricted tribal knowledge.  Ms. Posas has shared the ongoing development of this work through presentations at the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museum (2017), Society of California Archivist (2018), and Society of American Archivist (2018) conferences and in the publication “New Discoveries and New Directions for the Archaeological Archives at the Autry Museum of the American West,” in Advances in Archaeological Practice (August 2017). She is also a steering committee member for the Society of American Archivists’ Native American Archives Section (SAA-NAAS).

    Ms. Posas is also the Coordinator for LA as Subject (LAAS), a collaborative network hosted by the USC Libraries that works to promote and preserve the rich history of Los Angeles and Southern California.  She has held this appointed faculty position with the USC Libraries since 2009. To this end, Liza faciliatates collaborative projects with different organizations and individuals within the LAAS membership. These projects include the LA as Subject Resident Archivist program, grant-funded by IMLS, the Monomania LA video series funded by CalHumanties, and the annual Los Angeles Archives Bazaar co-hosted with the USC Libraries. The California Historical Records Advisory Board awarded Ms. Posas in 2018 wth the Archival Award of Excellence for her work with LA as Subject.

    The workshop is limited to 25 participants so please register as soon as possible to secure your spot.

    Registration open until April 17, 2020.

    The Walter P. Gray III Education Endowment Fund Scholarship offers funds up to $500 for registration and travel to SCA workshops. Submit an application form, including a proposed budget to Jennifer Martinez Wormser (jmwormse@scrippscollege.edu). Application forms and additional information are available here.

    • Questions about your membership? Contact Alix Norton.
    • Questions about Registration? Contact Adrienne Storey.
    • Problems with your credit card payment? Need to request a refund involving credit card or PayPal? Contact Liz Phillips.
    • April 22, 2020
    • April 25, 2020
    • San Francisco, CA

    More information is here: Western Archivists Meeting 2020.

    • April 22, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • The InterContinental San Francisco (room TBD)
    • 29
    Register

    What Can I Do With This?: Enabling Ethical Re-Use of your Content

    Wednesday, April 22, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

    The InterContinental San Francisco (room TBD)

    Workshop description:

    Many repositories are beginning to explore--or are even committed to--methods to help their researchers clearly understand how collections may be used. These

    methods range from Creative Commons licenses for finding aid metadata, licenses and standardized rights statements for digital collections, to Traditional Knowledge labels for Native American materials. But this trend may be deeply challenging to our curatorial traditions. How can you as an individual and an institution implement some of these methods in a way that is meaningful and sustainable? How do you manage the perceptions (and realities of) risk? How do these methods work at a larger (e.g. state, region, or national) scale?

    The workshop will offer both background about and hands-on practice in engaging these issues. Attendees will gain a strong understanding of the fundamentals of rights and licensing, risk management, and impacts. They’ll have some tools to adopt or adapt that their institution so that they can make informed and well-documented decisions.

    The instructor is not an attorney and cannot provide advice on risk or rights

    management policy decisions at their institutions.

    Instructor:

    Jodi Allison-Bunnell has twenty-four years of experience leading and participating in collaborations to increase access to unique content in archives,

    libraries, and museums by using shared systems and standards. Her experience

    includes developing and sustaining in-depth collaborations from startup to stability, connecting curators with end user needs, facilitation for stakeholders, developing interoperable metadata, and training that engages and inspires adult learners. In 2016-2018, she led the process of adopting standardized rights statements for digital collections at the Orbis Cascade Alliance. In 2017, the Alliance adopted Creative Commons licenses for Archives West; prior to that, she worked with OCLC Research’s Merrilee Profitt on the national and regional conversations (including one at the 2015 Roundup in Denver!) about that. She first engaged in discussions of copyright in unpublished works in graduate school; the resulting case study was published in American Archivist.

    The workshop is limited to 31 participants so please register as soon as possible to secure your spot.

    Registration open until April 17, 2020.

    The Walter P. Gray III Education Endowment Fund Scholarship offers funds up to $500 for registration and travel to SCA workshops. Submit an application form, including a proposed budget to Jennifer Martinez Wormser (jmwormse@scrippscollege.edu). Application forms and additional information are available here.

    • Questions about your membership? Contact Alix Norton.
    • Questions about Registration? Contact Adrienne Storey.
    • Problems with your credit card payment? Need to request a refund involving credit card or PayPal? Contact Liz Phillips.
    • April 22, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • The InterContinental San Francisco (room TBD)
    • 21
    Register

    The Community Archiving Workshop: Audiovisual Collections Care and Management

    Wednesday, April 22, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

    The InterContinental San Francisco (room TBD)

    Workshop description:

    Many librarians and archivists find themselves struggling to manage unique and aging film, video and audio recordings, and often lack the training and capacity to create, manage, preserve, and provide access to their audiovisual collections. The Community Archiving Workshop provides an opportunity for participants to engage in hands‐on processing, inspecting, and cataloging of audiovisual media – both analog and digital – and gain transferable skills to support their own collections. Most importantly, we will be working together to help a local organization gain intellectual and physical control of their endangered audiovisual collection. For more information see: www.communityarchiving.org. 

    Workshop participants will be paired with audiovisual archivists and community members to conduct basic processing, cataloging, and inspection of audiovisual recordings and, by doing so, will learn how to identify risk factors and make preservation recommendations. There will be presentations on collections care by audiovisual archivists, and stations where participants can learn film inspection/repair, and video cassette digitization. Attendees will gain experience in working with audiovisual recordings, learn to care for their collections, plan for digitization and preservation, and be a part of the critical work of processing an endangered local collection. 

    Instructors:

    Dinah Handel is the Digitization Services Manager at Stanford University, where she works across their digitization labs to provide quality services to Stanford University patrons and the community at large. Previously, she was the Mass Digitization Coordinator at the New York Public Library, and was a member of the 2015‐2016 NDSR‐NY cohort, as a resident at CUNY TV. She has also worked on community archives projects in New York and San Francisco. She holds an MLIS from Pratt Institute in New York, and a BA from Hampshire College. 

    Moriah Ulinskas is an audiovisual archivist whose work supports collections which fall outside mainstream historical narratives and institutions. From 2011 to 2017 she served as Diversity Chair for the Association of Moving Image Archivists, has been an organizing member of the Community Archiving Workshop since 2012, and was Preservation Program Director at the Bay Area Video Coalition from 2011 to 2014. She is a contributor to the recently published Citizen Internees: A Second Look at Race and Citizenship in Japanese American Internment Camps and is pursuing a PhD in Public History at the UC Santa Barbara and CSU Sacramento. 

    Pamela Vadakan directs California Revealed, a California State Library initiative to digitize and preserve archival collections related to California history from partner libraries, archives, museums and historical societies. She’s also a member of the Community Archiving Workshop and serves on the Board for the Center for Home Movies. She has a Master’s degree in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation from New York University. 

    Requirements:

    Please bring your laptop with Excel software installed, if possible. You will be working in groups to inspect and inventory a collection, so the ability to work with spreadsheets is imperative. 

    Who Should Attend:

    Anyone struggling to care for an audiovisual collection. No previous training required.

    The workshop is limited to 27 participants so please register as soon as possible to secure your spot.

    Registration open until April 17, 2020.

    The Walter P. Gray III Education Endowment Fund Scholarship offers funds up to $500 for registration and travel to SCA workshops. Submit an application form, including a proposed budget to Jennifer Martinez Wormser (jmwormse@scrippscollege.edu). Application forms and additional information are available here.

    • Questions about your membership? Contact Alix Norton.
    • Questions about Registration? Contact Adrienne Storey.
    • Problems with your credit card payment? Need to request a refund involving credit card or PayPal? Contact Liz Phillips.

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